Mindfulness

Change

“Don’t Throw Away The Buddha”

One of the Buddha’s central claims is that there are two chief factors that set the stage for human suffering and dissatisfaction. First, life is constant change. Our immediate environment is constantly changing.  We are constantly changing.  And because of this, over and over again many of the things we need or adore disappear from our lives.

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Generosity Buddha

Out of Compassion for the World

One out of one hundred Americans is currently behind bars. At our April 2018 meeting, the Sweeping Heart Zen Board voted unanimously to send ongoing financial support to the Prison Mindfulness Institute.  Support for PMI and its programs to relieve suffering is now part of Sweeping Heart Zen’s ongoing community service work.  At the present time then we’ve added our support for PMI to the monthly support we provide to The Grace Center and Action, Inc. in Gloucester.

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Cherry Blossoms

“Buddhism… Schmuddhism,” Just Wake Up!

Okay, I love the point, so I borrowed the “Buddhism Schmuddhism,” thing from Lama Surya Das.  His point?  The point?  Don’t bother becoming a Buddhist, or becoming  anything at all, for that matter.  Just wake up to the way things are now, to the way you are now.  Wake up to your life. Grow your inner goodness. Be the wide open knowing at your center.  Fall in love with and share your gifts.  Live who you truly are. Not tomorrow, not last week, live right now.

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fearless-girl-bull

Mindfulness, Turning Fear and Unpleasantness into Fluency

Diane Constantino is a member of the Sweeping Heart Zen sangha and a fluency specialist at The Center for Stuttering Therapy at Boston University.  In her inaugural  guest post here at sweepingheartzen.org, Diane writes about how she and her profession use mindfulness-based therapies to help people who stutter free themselves from the clutches of “shenpa.”  What’s shenpa?  Most of us face some version of it everyday.  Diane skillfully fills us in on the nuts and bolts of mindfulness and shenpa below.

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Spring Rain Renewal Meditation

Spring Rain, Renewal, And Meditation

One of the things we’re learning in meditation is to  live in the always present, unspeakably spontaneous, unpredictable liveliness of each moment.  After our early morning meditation at Sweeping Heart Zen we chant “May the mind flower bloom in eternal spring.”  That is, we remind ourselves that human beings can touch the eternal spring in each moment.

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mopping monk

Mopping Floor Zen

Two memories really got me thinking about Zen and mopping floors this week.  But before I go into that, I want to talk about one aspect of Zen. You’ve heard the expression “Chop wood, carry water.” Zen’s flavor is earthy and this saying captures that perfectly. This simple phase could just as well say, “Mop floors, wash dishes.” One thing this saying does is give full-throated encouragement to a Zen practitioner who aims to cultivate mindful attention in everything she does. This is how we practice.  In addition, the saying is encouragement to unhesitatingly do what needs doing.  Without doubt or fear.  Mopping floor Zen is down-to-earth, affectionate, and intimate.

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Relax-Let-Go

Rest and Relax in Awareness

We just entered our first 6-week practice period here at Sweeping Heart Zen. Before we started the period, people who formally entered this time of invigorated practice submitted what’s called a Practice Period Intention Form. One questions on the form asks, “What theme or issue do you intend to focus on during this Practice Period?” I intend to deeply rest and relax in awareness.

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Visible Gorilla

Meditation, The Invisible Gorilla and the Invisible Buddha

Why meditate? Why practice mindfulness? The general consensus today is that meditation and mindfulness reduce stress. Fortunately, if we simply stop, sit down, and pay attention to our breath, we find relief from stress—for sure. Yet, there is much more to meditation and mindfulness.  So this post is about how meditation and mindfulness can heighten our awareness of something called Inattentional Blindness. A force that hinders our happiness and our ability to make human connections.

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