Spring Rain Renewal Meditation

Spring Rain, Renewal, And Meditation

One of the things we’re learning in meditation is to  live in the always present, unspeakably spontaneous, unpredictable liveliness of each moment.  After our early morning meditation at Sweeping Heart Zen we chant “May the mind flower bloom in eternal spring.”  That is, we remind ourselves that human beings can touch the eternal spring in each moment.

Continue reading Spring Rain, Renewal, And Meditation

mopping monk

Mopping Floor Zen

Two memories really got me thinking about Zen and mopping floors this week.  But before I go into that, I want to talk about one aspect of Zen. You’ve heard the expression “Chop wood, carry water.” Zen’s flavor is earthy and this saying captures that perfectly. This simple phase could just as well say, “Mop floors, wash dishes.” One thing this saying does is give full-throated encouragement to a Zen practitioner who aims to cultivate mindful attention in everything she does. This is how we practice.  In addition, the saying is encouragement to unhesitatingly do what needs doing.  Without doubt or fear.  Mopping floor Zen is down-to-earth, affectionate, and intimate.

Continue reading Mopping Floor Zen


Rest and Relax in Awareness

We just entered our first 6-week practice period here at Sweeping Heart Zen. Before we started the period, people who formally entered this time of invigorated practice submitted what’s called a Practice Period Intention Form. One questions on the form asks, “What theme or issue do you intend to focus on during this Practice Period?” I intend to deeply rest and relax in awareness.

Continue reading Rest and Relax in Awareness

Visible Gorilla

Meditation, The Invisible Gorilla and the Invisible Buddha

Why meditate? Why practice mindfulness? The general consensus today is that meditation and mindfulness reduce stress. Fortunately, if we simply stop, sit down, and pay attention to our breath, we find relief from stress—for sure. Yet, there is much more to meditation and mindfulness.  So this post is about how meditation and mindfulness can heighten our awareness of something called Inattentional Blindness. A force that hinders our happiness and our ability to make human connections.

Continue reading Meditation, The Invisible Gorilla and the Invisible Buddha

Caring Natures

Limits: A Simpler, Less Biased, More Open Heart

Meditation and mindfulness literally change the human brain. Therefore, virtually anyone who practices consistently becomes less reactive, less stressed out, and less fearfully and defensively self-centered. What’s more, meditation practitioners progressively begin to see the interdependent nature of life more clearly. This is because a meditator’s heart begins to accept natural limits. She becomes simpler, less biased, more open hearted over time. Consequently, unfrozen from biases and fearful hesitation, she can act rightly when action is needed.

Continue reading Limits: A Simpler, Less Biased, More Open Heart

Mindfulness in Action

Mindfulness in Action: Sweeping Heart Zen

Sweeping Heart Zen has taken root in Gloucester in 2017. We’ve grown as a website and settled in as a center for meditation and Buddhist practice.  Consequently, I think it’s a good time to write a post to (re)introduce SHZ to our growing community of members, readers, and friends.  The Buddha described his teachings as, “…visible here and now, immediate…, to be experienced by the wise.” That is, he invited us to inspect, test, and experience his teachings firsthand.  The Buddha did not offer his teachings as dogma. They’re not a catechism-like checklist of ideas to believe.  On the contrary, the teachings are experiments in living to be tried and tested. One asks, “Do I grow in joy, peace, and contentment as I practice these teachings? Do the people close to me suffer less as I grow in this way of life?” Testing the merits of the teachings and the value of the techniques can be likened to mindfulness in action, to compassion in action. Consequently, the Sweeping Heart Zen Way is practical, experiential, broad minded, and nonsectarian.

Continue reading Mindfulness in Action: Sweeping Heart Zen

Chop Wood

Perform a Miracle! When Walking, Just Walk

In my last post I wrote that you, and I, and the earth that sustains us  are so incredibly improbable as to be next to impossible.  Furthermore, I wrote that what’s next to impossible is a miracle. Therefore I concluded, we and the earth are miracles.  A reasonable corollary follows from this conclusion, my miraculous friend.  It’s that since you are a miracle, even before you fix breakfast, everything you do is an extremely rare and wondrous event in the universe.  You and everything about you is a wonder, a one of a kind thing.  So, don’t hesitate to feel good about paying attention to what you do.  When walking, just walk.  When eating, relax, savor, just eat. Continue reading Perform a Miracle! When Walking, Just Walk

The Miracle

The Miracle of You, Remember it, Rest in it

Surely planet Earth is a miracle.  The Earth and it’s place in the universe still seems like a miracle despite centuries of scientific probing, conjecture and theory.  Don’t worry, since I have little training in science, I don’t aim to get deeply scientific in this post.  What I will do is use some jaw-dropping conclusions from science to remind us that you and I are miracles. Furthermore, I want to encourage you to remember to rest in the miracle you are.

Continue reading The Miracle of You, Remember it, Rest in it

Look With Attention

Meditation, Let Go, Begin Again, Part 2: Attention

A shift in the quality of our attention, and in what we pay attention to, is at the heart of mindfulness practice. In part one of this post, I cleared up three misconceptions that could prevent someone beginning a mindfulness meditation practice from getting a sustainable start. This post will briefly review those misconceptions, then  extend our discussion by focusing on the importance of developing the capacity for nonjudgmental attention in mindfulness practice.

Continue reading Meditation, Let Go, Begin Again, Part 2: Attention